Lesson 4: Applications of MI Copy

Initially applied to the issue of problem drinking, Motivational Interviewing has subsequently been applied to a wide variety of other behavioral health issues including drug abuse, compulsive gambling, eating disorders, anxiety disorders, tobacco cessation, mental health medication management, chronic disease (e.g. diabetes, heart disease) management, and other health-related behaviors (Arkowitz, et al., 2008, p. 1).

If you are wondering if MI can be applied in your particular health or behavioral health setting Miller and Rollnick (2013) suggest the following questions to use as a basis for reflection:

  • Are there (or should there be) conversations about change happening?
  • Will the outcomes for those you serve be influenced by the extent to which they make changes in their lives or behavior?
  • Is helping or encouraging people to make such changes a part of your service (or should it be)?
  • Are the people you serve often reluctant or ambivalent about making changes?
  • Are utilization of and adherence and retention in your services significant concerns?
  • Do staff struggle with or complain about people who are “unmotivated,” “resistant,” or “difficult”?

If you answered yes to any of these questions, it is likely that MI would be a useful approach in your work with people.

Because MI is a person-centered style of engaging the consumer it is also a culturally sensitive method of helping and can be combined with other treatment approaches (most notably Cognitive Behavioral Therapy) (Miller and Rollnick, 2013, pp. 340–351). The growing body of research suggests that MI is transferable across cultures, that it can be effective in group work, family consultations, telephonic smoking cessation programs, telehealth video consultations, in educational and corrections settings and applied to any number of health, mental health and substance use behaviors (Miller and Rollnick, 2013, pp. 337–351).

In our final lesson we will briefly explore some of the adaptations and applications of MI in mental health, co-occurring disorders, and health-related treatment contexts.


Copyright Notice

Copyright Patricia A. Burke, all rights reserved. You may download or print one copy of the material in this course for your personal use.


References

Arkowitz, H. & Burke, B. L. (2008). Motivational Interviewing as an integrative framework for the treatment of depression (pp. 145–172). In H. Arkowitz, H. A. Westra, W. R. Miller & S. Rollnick (Eds.), Motivational Interviewing in the treatment of psychological problems. New York: Guilford Press.

Arkowitz, H., Westra, A., Miller, W.R. & Rollnick, S. (Eds.). (2008). Motivational Interviewing in the treatment of psychological problems. New York: Guilford Press.

Brody, A. (2009). Motivational Interviewing with a depressed adolescent. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 65: 1168–1179.

Martino, S., Carroll, K., Kostas, D., Perkins, J. & Rounsaville, B. (December, 2002). Dual Diagnosis Motivational Interviewing: a modification of Motivational Interviewing for substance-abusing patients with psychotic disorders. Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, 23(4): 297–308, (pp. 1-20).

Miller, W. R., & Rollnick, S. (2013). Motivational interviewing: Preparing people for change (3rd ed.) New York: Guilford Press.

Rollnick, S., Miller, W.R. & Butler, C. C. (2008). Motivational interviewing in health care: helping patients change behavior. New York: Guilford Press.

Westra, H. A. & Dozois, D. J. A. (2008). Integrating Motivational Interviewing into the treatment of Anxiety (pp. 26–56). In H. Arkowitz, H. A. Westra, W. R. Miller & S. Rollnick (Eds.), Motivational Interviewing in the treatment of psychological problems. New York: Guilford Press.

Venner, K. L., Feldstein, S. W. & Tafoya, N. (2006). Native American Motivational Interviewing: Weaving Native American and Western Practices. Washington, DC: National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA).